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Secondary Orbital Tumors Extending from Ocular or Periorbital Structures

  • Roman Shinder
  • Bita Esmaeli
Chapter
Part of the M.D. Anderson Solid Tumor Oncology Series book series (MDA, volume 6)

Abstract

Secondary orbital tumors are those that extend into the orbit from contiguous structures, such as the globe, eyelids, lacrimal sac, bone, sinuses, nasopharynx, and brain. They account for approximately one-quarter of orbital neoplasia. A computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan is used to investigate suspicious lesions, and biopsy is typically undertaken to establish a tissue diagnosis and help construct a treatment plan. Prognosis is often poor owing to significant extension of the tumor at presentation.

Keywords

Optic Nerve Basal Cell Carcinoma Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Fibrous Dysplasia Uveal Melanoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Section of Ophthalmology, Department of Head and Neck SurgeryThe University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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