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Management of Uveal Melanoma

  • Michelle LudwigEmail author
  • Adam S. Garden
  • Michelle D. Williams
  • Dan S. Gombos
Chapter
Part of the M.D. Anderson Solid Tumor Oncology Series book series (MDA, volume 6)

Abstract

About 3% of all melanomas are of ocular origin; of these, 85% are uveal. Uveal melanomas are rare, with standardized incidence rates ranging from approximately 2 to 8 cases per 1 million people in the United States and Europe. The typical presentation of uveal melanoma depends on the site of origin: choroid, iris, or ciliary body. About 80–90% of all uveal melanomas develop in the posterior choroid. Uveal melanoma is typically a clinical rather than a pathologic diagnosis. Currently, several options are available for the management of uveal melanoma, including observation, transpupillary thermotherapy, brachytherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, proton radiotherapy, and tumor resection.

Keywords

Optic Nerve Ciliary Body Uveal Melanoma Choroidal Melanoma Include Liver Function Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michelle Ludwig
    • 1
    Email author
  • Adam S. Garden
    • 1
  • Michelle D. Williams
    • 2
  • Dan S. Gombos
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyThe University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PathologyThe University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Section of Ophthalmology, Department of Head and Neck SurgeryThe University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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