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Biofuels, Policy Options, and Their Implications: Analyses Using Partial and General Equilibrium Approaches

  • Farzad Taheripour
  • Wallace E. Tyner
Chapter
Part of the Natural Resource Management and Policy book series (NRMP, volume 33)

Abstract

In this chapter, we highlight some important aspects of biofuels development and policies from partial and general equilibrium perspectives. We first examine US biofuel policy backgrounds to determine factors which caused the boom in the ethanol industry in recent years. Then, we use a partial equilibrium model to investigate the economic consequences of further expansion in the ethanol industry for the key economic variables of the US agricultural and energy markets. This analysis is done for a range of alternative policy options and crude oil prices. Finally, we extend our analyses to examine consequences of further biofuel production at a global scale.

Keywords

Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Mandate Policy Ethanol Industry Global Trade Analysis Project Biofuel Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Purdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural EconomicsPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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