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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Addiction

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Abstract

Cognitive behavioral therapy is one of the frequently applied evidence-based psychotherapies for addiction and other psychiatric disorders. Cognitive behavioral therapy consists of a theoretical approach to conceptualizing disorders that can be described systematically, applied consistently, and validated empirically. In this chapter, we review: (1) the theory and conceptualization of cognitive behavioral therapy for addiction; (2) the application of cognitive behavioral therapy strategies for treating various addictions, focusing on alcohol and cocaine, as well as the challenges and solutions involved in the use of cognitive behavioral therapy, and (3) the research support for cognitive behavioral therapy in treating specific addictions and the limitations of these findings identified in the research literature thus far, and, finally, (4) we present future directions for research, including the application of cognitive behavioral therapy for co-occurring disorders.

Keywords

  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Addiction
  • Coping skills
  • Functional analysis
  • Social learning theory
  • Stress and coping

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Correspondence to J. Kim Penberthy .

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Penberthy, J.K., Wartella, J.A., Vaughan, M. (2010). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Addiction. In: Johnson, B. (eds) Addiction Medicine. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0338-9_36

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0338-9_36

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, New York, NY

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