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Developmental Sequences and Comorbidity of Substance Use and Violence

  • Helene Raskin White
  • Kristina M. Jackson
  • Rolf Loeber
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Throughout the world, violence is among the leading causes of death for people age 15–44 years (Krug, Dahlberg, Mercy, Zwi, & Lozano, 2002). Uniformly, alcohol and drug use are risk factors that are associated with violence within this age group. In fact, alcohol use is implicated in about half the incidents of violent crime (Murdoch, Pihl, & Ross, 1990).

Keywords

Young Adulthood Violent Crime Heavy Drinking Violent Behavior Trajectory Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Portions of this chapter were excerpted from White and Gorman (2000). Preparation of this chapter was supported, in part, by grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (DA411018 and DA17552), the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (K01 AA13938), the National Institute on Mental Health (MH73941 and MH50778), and the U.S. Department of Justice (96-MU-FX-0020). Points of view or opinions in this chapter are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official positions or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice or the National Institutes on Drug Abuse, Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and Mental Health. The authors thank Judit Ward, Dan Calandro and James Cox for their help with the literature search and references.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helene Raskin White
    • 1
  • Kristina M. Jackson
    • 2
  • Rolf Loeber
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Rutgers, The State University of New JerseyPiscatawayUSA
  2. 2.Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  3. 3.University of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  4. 4.Free UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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