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The Many Ways of Knowing: Multi-Method, Comparative Research to Enhance Our Understanding of and Responses to Youth Street Gangs

  • Dana Peterson
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

What are the ways we know what we know? What are the various sources of information, how do we interpret them, and how do their sometimes disparate stories fit together? My goal in this chapter is to highlight what I see as needs in future youth gang research, in the areas of both the nature of youth gangs/gang members and our societal responses to them. While this is by no means meant to be an exhaustive account of the state of youth gang research, readers will get a sense of our current knowledge about these issues through the discussion.

Keywords

Gang Member Gang Membership Street Gang Youth Gang Gang Involvement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dana Peterson
    • 1
  1. 1.University at Albany, SUNYAlbanyUSA

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