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Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

  • Amori Yee Mikami
  • Allison Jack
  • Matthew D. Lerner
Chapter

Abstract

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent disorders of childhood, characterized by a persistent, impairing pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity. Youth with ADHD are known to be at high risk for adjustment problems, including academic underachievement and school failure, disruptive and oppositional behaviors, substance abuse problems, internalizing behaviors, and poor social relationships with adults and with peers (Barkley, 2002; Hinshaw, Owens, Sami, & Fargeon, 2006; Mannuzza & Klein, 2000). Each domain of impairment merits attention, but for the purposes of this chapter we primarily focus on the difficulties in peer relationships faced by youth with ADHD.

Keywords

Social Skill ADHD Symptom Social Competence Sluggish Cognitive Tempo Social Skill Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amori Yee Mikami
    • 1
  • Allison Jack
    • 1
  • Matthew D. Lerner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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