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Performance Modeling of Enterprise Grids

  • Doug L. Hoffman
  • Amy Apon
  • Larry Dowdy
  • Baochuan Lu
  • Nathan Hamm
  • Linh Ngo
  • Hung Bui
Chapter
Part of the International Series in Operations Research & Management Science book series (ISOR, volume 132)

Abstract

Modeling has long been recognized as an invaluable tool for predicting the performance behavior of computer systems. Modeling software, both commercial and open source, is widely used as a guide for the development of new systems and the upgrading of exiting ones. Tools such as queuing network models, stochastic Petri nets, and event driven simulation are in common use for stand-alone computer systems and networks. Unfortunately, no set of comprehensive tools exists for modeling complex distributed computing environments such as the ones found in emerging grid deployments. With the rapid advance of grid computing, the need for improved modeling tools specific to the grid environment has become evident. This chapter addresses concepts, methodologies, and tools that are useful when designing, implementing, and tuning the performance in grid and cluster environments

Keywords

Service Level Agreement Capacity Planning Shared Service First Come First Serve Queueing Network Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Doug L. Hoffman
    • 1
  • Amy Apon
    • 2
  • Larry Dowdy
    • 3
  • Baochuan Lu
    • 2
  • Nathan Hamm
    • 3
  • Linh Ngo
    • 1
  • Hung Bui
    • 2
  1. 1.Acxiom CorporationConwayUSA
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of Arkansas at FayettevilleFayettevilleUSA
  3. 3.Department of Computer ScienceVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA

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