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Self–injury

  • Timothy R. Vollmer
  • Kimberly N. Sloman
  • Andrew L. Samaha
Chapter

Abstract

One of the most dangerous and debilitating behavior problems in the entire field of developmental disabilities is self-injurious behavior. This set of target behaviors is also a frequent concern in ASD. A review of common targets for intervention and research supported treatment will be covered. Current status of the field and future directions will be discussed

Keywords

Problem Behavior Differential Reinforcement Indirect Assessment Prefer Item Functional Communication Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy R. Vollmer
    • 1
  • Kimberly N. Sloman
    • 1
  • Andrew L. Samaha
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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