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Rituals and Stereotypies

  • Jeffrey H. Tiger
  • Karen A. Toussaint
  • Megan L. Kliebert
Chapter

Abstract

This group of behaviors constitutes third core feature of ASD. ABA is the most effective means of addressing the problems. The specific problems and research based interventions will be addressed.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Autism Spectrum Disorder Problem Behavior Repetitive Behavior Enrich Environment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey H. Tiger
    • 1
  • Karen A. Toussaint
    • 1
  • Megan L. Kliebert
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA

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