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Social Skills and Autism: Understanding and Addressing the Deficits

  • Mary Jane Weiss
  • Robert H. LaRue
  • Andrea Newcomer
Chapter

Abstract

Social behavior is a core deficit area of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Therefore, considerable literature in the ABA field has been developed to address this problem area. Specific behaviors treated and ABA techniques used will be the focus of the chapter. A critical appraisal of current status and future directions will also be provided.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Autism Spectrum Disorder Social Skill Joint Attention Apply Behavior Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Jane Weiss
    • 1
  • Robert H. LaRue
    • 1
  • Andrea Newcomer
    • 1
  1. 1.Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, RutgersThe State University of New JerseyNew BrunswickUSA

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