Parent Training Interventions for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Lauren Brookman-Frazee
  • Laurie Vismara
  • Amy Drahota
  • Aubyn Stahmer
  • Daniel Openden
Chapter

Abstract

A number of parent training programs for parents of children with ASD have been developed. An overview and rationale for why parent training for ASD differs from other childhood groups will be described. An overview of the major parent training methods used for ASD, the research to support them, and the effects achieved will be discussed.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Parent Training Disruptive Behavior Disorder Parent Training Program Disruptive Behavior Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lauren Brookman-Frazee
    • 1
  • Laurie Vismara
    • 1
  • Amy Drahota
    • 1
  • Aubyn Stahmer
    • 1
  • Daniel Openden
    • 1
  1. 1.Child and Adolescent Services Research Center (CASRC)University of California-San DiegoSan DiegoUSA

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