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Recovering Exadata

  • Martin Bach
  • Karl Arao
  • Andy Colvin
  • Frits Hoogland
  • Kerry Osborne
  • Randy Johnson
  • Tanel Poder

Abstract

You may have heard the saying “disk drives spin, and then they die.” It’s not something we like to think about, but from the moment you power up a new system, your disk drives begin aging. Disk drives have come a long way in the past 30 years, and typical life expectancy has improved dramatically. At the end of the day, though, it’s a matter of “when” a disk will fail, not “if.” And we all know that many disk drives fail long before they should. Knowing how to diagnose disk failures and what to do when they occur has generally been the responsibility of the system administrator or storage administrator. For many DBAs, Exadata is going to change that. Many Exadata systems out there are being managed entirely by the DBA staff. Whether or not this is the case in your data center, the procedure for recovering from a disk failure on Exadata is going to be a little different from what you are used to.

Keywords

File System Disk Drive Database Server Cell Disk Storage Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Martin Bach, Karl Arao, Andy Colvin, Frits Hoogland, Randy Johnson, Kerry Osborne, and Tanel Poder 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Bach
    • 1
  • Karl Arao
    • 1
  • Andy Colvin
    • 1
  • Frits Hoogland
    • 1
  • Kerry Osborne
    • 1
  • Randy Johnson
    • 1
  • Tanel Poder
    • 1
  1. 1.TXUS

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