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Abstract

On my very first SharePoint job back in 2001, I spent hours backing up, copying and restoring the SharePoint installation from an internal domain to the one accessible to users from the Internet. This was not a backup strategy; it was a crude way to get content to the Internet while keeping the intranet secure. But it made the system very vulnerable to failure. Every time content was updated, I had to manually overwrite the production SPS 2001 with the updated staging SPS 2001 out of hours so users could see the changes the next day. This started to become a nightly occurrence. I still remember the feeling of fear every time I had to run the commands to overwrite the production farm and bring it up to date. I would stare at that cursor while it made up its mind (far too casually, I thought) to bring everything in line. I would sigh with relief when it worked and I was able to see the changes there. I still feel the sense of mild panic when it didn’t work and I had to troubleshoot what went wrong. It was usually an easy fix—some step I missed—but sometimes it was a change to the network or the Exchange server where the data was stored or a Windows security issue.

Keywords

High Availability Service Level Agreement Disaster Recovery Super Structure Solution Architecture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Stephen Cummins 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Cummins

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