Advertisement

Responsive Design

  • Jonathan Lane
  • Tom Barker
  • Joseph R. Lewis
  • Meitar Moscovitz

Abstract

Responsive design is a new name for an old concept. The term responsive used to be applied mainly when talking about a website’s speed (i.e., if a website was fast, it had a good response time). Lately, the term has been co-opted for a different purpose. A responsive website now refers to a website that responds to its viewport. It used to be that web designers had to concern themselves only with a minimum screen resolution of 640 pixels by 480 pixels and a maximum resolution of 1280 by 1024 pixels. Two factors have led to both the floor being dropped and the ceiling being raised. First, the sharp rise in mobile and tablet devices used to access the web has dropped the floor all the way down to 240 by 320 pixels. Second, a sharp increase in screen resolutions coupled with the introduction of widescreen monitors has raised the resolution ceiling to 2560 by 1440 pixels (and possibly even larger than that). How are we expected to produce a website that looks good given such a range of devices?

Keywords

Mobile Device Small Screen Style Sheet Tablet Device Screen Width 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Jonathan Lane, Tom Barker, Joseph R. Lewis, and Meitar Moscovitz 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Lane
  • Tom Barker
  • Joseph R. Lewis
  • Meitar Moscovitz

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations