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Table Structures and Indexing

  • Louis Davidson
  • Jessica M. Moss

Abstract

To me, the true beauty of the relational database engine comes from its declarative nature. As a programmer, I simply ask the engine a question, and it answers it. The questions I ask are usually pretty simple; just give me some data from a few tables, correlate it on some of the data, do a little math perhaps, and give me back these pieces of information (and naturally do it incredibly fast if you don’t mind). Generally, the engine obliges with an answer extremely quickly. But how does it do it? If you thought it was magic, you would not be right. It is a lot of complex code implementing a massive amount of extremely complex algorithms that allow the engine to answer your questions in a timely manner. With every passing version of SQL Server, that code gets better at turning your relational request into a set of operations that gives you the answers you desire in remarkably small amounts of time. These operations will be shown to you on a query plan, which is a blueprint of the algorithms used to execute your query. I will use query plans often in this chapter and others to show you how your design choices can affect the way work gets done.

Keywords

Unique Index Query Plan Table Structure Cluster Index Data Page 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Louis Davidson with Jessica M. Moss 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louis Davidson
  • Jessica M. Moss

There are no affiliations available

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