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Storage Indexes

  • Kerry Osborne
  • Randy Johnson
  • Tanel Pöder

Abstract

Storage Indexes are the most useful Exadata feature that you never hear about. They are not indexes that are stored in the database like Oracle’s traditional B-Tree or bitmapped indexes. In fact, they are not indexes at all in the traditional sense. They are not capable of identifying a set of records that has a certain value in a given column. Rather, they are a feature of the storage server software that is designed to eliminate disk I/O. They are sometimes described as “reverse indexes.” That’s because they identify locations where the requested records are not, instead of the other way around. They work by storing minimum and maximum column values for disk storage units, which are 1 Megabyte (MB) by default. Because SQL predicates are passed to the storage servers when Smart Scans are performed, the storage software can check the predicates against the Storage Index metadata (maximum and minimum values) before doing the requested I/O. Any storage region that cannot possibly have a matching row is skipped. In many cases, this can result in a significant reduction in the amount of I/O that must be performed. Keep in mind that since the storage software needs the predicates to compare to the maximum and minimum values in the Storage Indexes, this optimization is only available for Smart Scans.

Keywords

Storage Server Storage Cell Trace File Storage Region Hide Parameter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kerry Osborne, Randy Johnson, Tanel Pöder 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kerry Osborne
  • Randy Johnson
  • Tanel Pöder

There are no affiliations available

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