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Getting Started

  • Grant Allen
  • Mike Owens

Abstract

No matter what platform you work on, SQLite is easy to install and build. Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux users can obtain binaries directly from the SQLite website. Users of many other operating systems can also obtain binaries using their native—or even third-party—package systems. The common way to work with SQLite across all platforms is using the SQLite command-line program (CLP). This program operates as both a command-line tool and an interactive shell. You can issue queries and do essential database administration tasks such as creating tables, indexes, and views as well as exporting and importing data. SQLite databases are contained in single operating system files, so doing things like backups are very simple—just copy the file. For long-term backups, however, it is always best to dump the database in SQL format, because this is portable across SQLite versions. In the next few chapters, you will be using the CLP to explore SQL and the database aspects of SQLite. We will start with the basics of using SQL with SQLite in Chapter 3 and move to more advanced SQL in Chapter 4.

Keywords

Command Line Source Distribution Source File Database Object Page Size 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Grant Allen and Mike Owens 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Grant Allen
  • Mike Owens

There are no affiliations available

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