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Structures and Tiers

  • Andres R. Sanchez

Abstract

As a department within a technology company, the support organization requires some form of order to make the best use of resources. Our field of technical support has relied on the tiered structure for many years now, and it has proven very effective. There are other possibilities that may well prove even better, depending on the organizations and demands placed on the support professionals. The current state of the support structure is heavily dependent on the predominant support model of tiers based in knowledge and experience.

Keywords

Support Group Technical Support Support Structure Support Organization Flat Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations Abridged (West Valley City, UT: Waking Lion Press, 2007) pp 3–12.Google Scholar
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    James D Mooney, The Principles of Organization (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1947).Google Scholar
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    Phil Verghis “No More (Support) Tiers!: Savvy Support” Verghis View Newsletter April 2008. http://www.verghisgroup.com/publications/verghis-view-april-2008/ Accessed April 26, 2009.Google Scholar
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    Richard Kopelman, “Job Redesign and Productivity: A Review of the Evidence,” National Productivity Review, Summer 1985, pp 239.Google Scholar
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    Joe Fleischer and Brendan Read, The Complete Guide to Customer Support (Gilroy, CA: CMP Books, 2002) pp 76–79. The authors describe the Divide and Channel approach as a way in which the support organization makes the best use of its resources by dividing the support personnel depending on the medium that the customer requests come into the support department. Specifically, they address the support via email which may come to one group of support people devoted only to that medium. Others may be devoted to other mediums of communications; hence, the name Divide and Channel approach.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© CA, Inc. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andres R. Sanchez

There are no affiliations available

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