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Leadership in Support

  • Andres R. Sanchez

Abstract

Why do some people seem to move the masses or at least their cube neighbors with just a word? What is it that makes others spill their guts and yet not entice a single person to even lookup and respond? During my career, I asked these questions many times when I saw seemingly powerless people say a few words and have the big shots follow. This sort of influence is a personal power that emanates from something bigger than simple knowledge or authority. This is called leadership.

Keywords

Support Group Technical Support Leadership Role Transformational Leader Leadership Style 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Gary Yukl, Leadership in Organizations (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2006), 21. In this definition, Yukl quotes (Hemphill & Coons, 1957, p.7) and is only the first of 10 definitions and the one that best describes leadership as it takes place in technical support.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Robert Greenleaf, Servant Leadership, A Journey into the Nature of Legitimate Power & Greatness (New Jersey: Paulist Press, 1977), 27. This leadership model originated formally with Robert Greenleaf but was described in essence by Socrates and many others since.Google Scholar
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    Bernard M. Bass, Leadership and Performance Beyond Expectations (New York: Free Press, 1985), p. 12.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Robert Greenleaf, Servant Leadership, A Journey into the Nature of Legitimate Power & Greatness (New Jersey: Paulist Press, 1977), 56–57. Greenleaf states that there is no easy way of knowing who the servant leader really.Google Scholar
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    J.C. Wooford, Vicki Goodwin, and J. Lee Whittington, “A field study of a cognitive approach to understanding transformational and transactional leadership,” Leadership Quarterly, vol. 9, no. 1 (1998) pp.55–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    William James, Pragmatism and Other Essays (New York: Washington Square Press, 1975), 16–17. In Lecture One: The Present Dilemma in Philosophy, James describes the disconnect that philosphers have with the real world. He puts forward the argument that while philosophers argue on what they can imagine or set to prove, it is only the real experience that has any real meaning since it is, in fact, the true reality.Google Scholar
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    E.A. Fleishman, “Twenty Years of Consideration and Structure,” Current Developments in the Study of Leadership, ed. E.A. Fleishman and J.C. Hunt (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1973).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Gary Yukl, Leadership in Organizations (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2006) p. 100–101.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© CA, Inc. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andres R. Sanchez

There are no affiliations available

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