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Summary

Coupling is one of those subjects that many people find terribly boring. The problem might stem from the fact that for most people, the word “coupling” isn’t specific. Hopefully, the material presented in this chapter has helped you understand the various facets of coupling. Knowing what coupling is and what effects it has, you might be inclined to spend time in your next project thinking about ways to design and partition your code to keep coupling under control. After all, a system with minimal coupling is much easier to develop, test, and maintain.

Keywords

Unify Modeling Language Static Coupling Child Class Type Coupling Signature Coupling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Ted Faison 2006

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