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Defining Standards for the 21st Century

Most countries around the world have entered the 21st century with increased focus on and requirements for educational accountability, expressed through a variety of assessment regimes and policies. Common to these directions is talk about ‘standards’ in education. For example, there is talk about setting standards (preferring high standards and eschewing low standards), monitoring standards (emphasising school and teacher accountability), raising standards (improving educational outcomes) and reporting on standards (saying how well students are progressing in school). Talk about standards pervades current discussions about education, particularly, for the focus of this book, discussions that involve educational assessment.

Keywords

21st Century Student Learning Performance Standard High Standard Individual Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Educational ConsultantBrisbaneAustralia

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