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Moving North: Archaeobotanical Evidence for Plant Diet in Middle and Upper Paleolithic Europe

  • Martin Jones
Part of the Vertebrate Paleobiology and Paleoanthropology book series (VERT)

This paper reviews the evidence for Middle and Upper Paleolithic plant foods in Europe and neighboring regions. Up until now, most research into the prehistory of plant foods has been conducted on Neolithic and post-Neolithic communities. In recent decades, that has been extended to explore preludes to agriculture and to connect contemporary ethnobotany with the recent archaeological record. The review conducted here shifts focus to the problems of Paleolithic human ecology itself and the challenge of acquiring sufficient plant foods in the novel environments that the first generations of humans crossed and colonized.

Keywords

Archaeobotany plant foods 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ArchaeologyUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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