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How Do I Influence the Generation of Living Educational Theories for Personal and Social Accountability in Improving Practice? Using a Living Theory Methodology in Improving Educational Practice

  • Jack Whitehead
Chapter
Part of the Self Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices book series (STEP, volume 9)

The context of this self-study is my working life in Education between 1967 and 2008. Most of that life, between 1973 and 2008, has been lived in the Department of Education of the University of Bath where I am seeking to contribute to a draft Mission of the University in developing a distinct academic approach to the education of professional practitioners. The approach outlined below is focused on the generation of a living theory methodology in exploring the question, How do I influence the generation of living educational theories for personal and social accountability in improving practice? It also includes a new epistemology for educational knowledge from creating living educational theories in inquiries of the kind, How do I improve what I am doing?  The living theory research methodology used to address this question emerged during the course of my 40-year inquiry. It draws on multi-media explanations of educational influences in learning to communicate the meanings of the expression of embodied values and life-affirming energy in educational relationships. The chapter emphasizes the importance of the uniqueness of each individual’s living educational theory (Whitehead, 1989a) and their methodological inventiveness (Dadds & Hart, 2001) in asking, researching and answering questions of the kind, How do I improve what I am doing?

Keywords

Educational Theory Educational Development Social Validation Social Accountability Unpublished Dissertation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Bath, Department of EducationUK

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