Advertisement

Planning Cells and Citizen Juries in Environmental Policy: Deliberation and Its Limits

  • Brendan FlynnEmail author

This chapter considers whether citizen juries are likely to encourage better environmental policy decisions. The chief argument presented here is that they achieve a type of deliberation over policy options which is valuable because it forces engagement between the views, values and information of ordinary citizen with those of policy experts or other ‘insiders’. However, more ambitious claims for citizen juries must be balanced against their apparent institutional fragility, and related weaknesses.

Consideration of the background of the citizen jury idea is briefly given here, followed by discussion of some comparative experiences with citizen juries. This is followed by a more in-depth and critical evaluation of a trial citizen jury on waste policy held in Ireland, which the author administered.

Keywords

Environmental Policy Policy Process County Council Citizen Participation Policy Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Armour, A. (1995). The citizens jury model of public participation: A critical evaluation. In O. Renn, T. Webler, & P. Wiedemann (Eds.), Fairness and competence in citizen participation: Evaluating models for environmental discourses. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer.Google Scholar
  2. Babbie, E. (2001). The practice of social research, 9th ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.Google Scholar
  3. Bostwick, M. (1999). Twelve angry citizens: Can citizens' juries improve local democracy in New Zealand? Political Science, 2, 236–246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Busenberg, G. J. (2000). Resources, political support, and citizen participation in environmental policy: A re-examination of conventional wisdom. Society & Natural Resources, 6, 579–587.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Coote, A. & Lenaghan, J. (1997). Citizens' juries: Theory into practice. London: Institute for Public Policy Research.Google Scholar
  6. Crosby, N. (1995). Citizens juries: One solution for difficult environmental questions. In O. Renn, T. Webler, & P. Wiedemann (Eds.), Fairness and competence in citizen participation: Evaluating models for environmental discourses. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer.Google Scholar
  7. Damania, R. (1999). Political competition, rent seeking and the choice of environmental policy instruments. Environmental & Resource Economics, 415–433.Google Scholar
  8. Delap, C. (1998). Making better decisions: Report of an IPPR symposium on citizens' juries and other methods of public involvement. London: Institute for Public Policy Research.Google Scholar
  9. Dienel, P. C. & Renn, O. (1995). Planning cells: A gate to “fractal” mediation. In O. Renn, T. Webler, & P. Wiedemann (Eds.), Fairness and competence in citizen participation: Evaluating models for environmental discourses. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer.Google Scholar
  10. Downes, D. (1996). Neo-corporatism and environmental policy. Australian Journal of Political Science, 2, 175–190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Galway Corporation, Galway County Council, M. C. O’Sullivan Ltd & COWI (1999). Draft connaught waste management plan. Galway, Ireland: Galway Corporation/Galway County Council.Google Scholar
  12. Green, A. J. (1997). Public participation and environmental policy outcomes. Canadian Public Policy-Analyse De Politiques, 4, 435–458.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Hindmoor, A. (1999). Rent seeking evaluated. Journal of Political Philosophy, 434–452.Google Scholar
  14. IDoELG/Irish Department of Environmental & Local Government (1998). Waste management: Changing our ways — a political statement. Dublin: IDoELG.Google Scholar
  15. Lenaghan J., New, B., & Mitchell, E. (1996). Setting priorities: Is there a role for citizens' juries? British Medical Journal, 7046, 1591–1593.Google Scholar
  16. Mueller, D. C. (1989). Public choice II. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  17. O'Sullivan, K. (1999). Galway jury out on council's plans for waste disposal. The Irish Times, 08/11/1999.Google Scholar
  18. Seiler, H-J. (1995). Review of planning cells: “Problems of legitimation”. In O. Renn, T. Webler, & P. Wiedemann (Eds.), Fairness and competence in citizen participation: Evaluating models for environmental discourses. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer.Google Scholar
  19. Siggins, L. (2000a). Galway dampens thermal waste plan. The Irish Times, 26/07/2000.Google Scholar
  20. Siggins, L. (2000b). No waste plan and widespread dumping. The Irish Times, 04/09/2000.Google Scholar
  21. Siggins, L. (2000c). Galway waste plan seen as ‘fundamentally flawed’. The Irish Times, 16/05/2000.Google Scholar
  22. Smith, G. & Wales, C. (2000). Citizens’ juries and deliberative democracy. Political Studies, 1, 51–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Stewart, J., Kendall, E., & Coote, A. (1994). Citizens’ juries. London: Institute for Public Policy Research.Google Scholar
  24. Van den Hove, S. (2000). Participatory approaches to environmental policy-making: The European Commission climate policy process as a case study. Ecological Economics, 33(3), 457–472.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Weale, A. (1999). Democracy. London: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  26. Webler, T. & Renn, O. (1995). A brief primer on participation: Philosophy and practice. In O. Renn, T. Webler, & P. Wiedemann (Eds.), Fairness and competence in citizen participation: Evaluating models for environmental discourses. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National University of IrelandGalway, Department of Political Science and SociologyGalwayIreland

Personalised recommendations