Eradicating Plant Invaders: Combining Ecologically-Based Tactics and Broad-Sense Strategy

  • Richard N. Mack
  • Sara K. Foster
Part of the Invading Nature – Springer Series In Invasion Ecology book series (INNA, volume 5)

Abstract

Eradication, i.e., the complete destruction, of all individuals of an Invasive Alien Species (IAS) in a new range is universally viewed as the permanent solution to damaging these plants, assuming any reentry of the target species is reliably prevented. Yet eradication is often deemed impractical if not effectively impossible, except when the alien species occurs in very low numbers in a single circumscribed beachhead. This contention may have arisen in part because many immigrant species upon first detection already consist of numerous, spreading populations. Consequently, control (i.e., containment) of the alien species is viewed as the only feasible alternative. We contend this view of eradication dwells disproportionately on the failures to eradicate nonnative species without comprehensive examination of total (or near total) eradications. A more balanced view of the feasibility of eradications may emerge if we trace the events, features, and circumstances that successful eradications hold in common. Most useful will be careful application of strategies that have led to eradications, of which winning and keeping public support is likely the single most important contributor to success.

Keywords

Berberis vulgaris Eradication Miconia calvescens Plant invasions Striga asiatica 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard N. Mack
    • 1
  • Sara K. Foster
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biological Sciences, Washington State UniversityPullmanUSA

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