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Approach of the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization to the Evaluation and Management of Risks Presented by Invasive Alien Plants

  • Sarah Brunel
  • Françoise Petter
  • Eladio Fernandez-Galiano
  • Ian Smith
Part of the Invading Nature – Springer Series In Invasion Ecology book series (INNA, volume 5)

Abstract

Invasive alien plants may be introduced intentionally with trade (80% of current invasive alien plants in Europe were introduced as ornamental or agricultural plants) or unintentionally (as contaminants of grain, seeds, soil, machinery etc., or with travellers). Preventing the introduction of invasive alien plants is considered more cost-effective, from both environmental and economic points of view, than managing them after introduction. Pest risk analysis (PRA) standards have been developed by the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) and the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO) to allow assessment of the phytosanitary risk presented by invasive alien plants, and the development of appropriate measures to prevent their introduction and spread. These measures may in turn have an impact on international trade, and the obligations arising from trade agreements have also to be taken into account when phytosanitary measures are established. PRA basically consists in a framework for organizing biological and other scientific and economic information to assess risk. This leads to the identification of management options to reduce the risk to an acceptable level. Within the EPPO context, the results of these PRAs are translating into recommendations for countries to implement their national regulations. This article gives an overview of the international framework for regulation of invasive alien plants under the IPPC. It then presents the approach followed by EPPO for the evaluation and management of risks presented by such plants, as well as its application.

Keywords

European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization Pest risk analysis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah Brunel
    • 1
  • Françoise Petter
    • 1
  • Eladio Fernandez-Galiano
    • 1
  • Ian Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO)ParisFrance

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