Invasive Plants: Their Role in Species Extinctions and Economic Losses to Agriculture in the USA

  • David Pimentel
Part of the Invading Nature – Springer Series In Invasion Ecology book series (INNA, volume 5)

Abstract

The more than 50,000 species of plants, animals, and microbes introduced into the United States cause more extinction of native species than most any other threats and cause more than $120 billion in damages and control costs each year. An assessment of the invasive plants that have been introduced and their control and damage costs will be estimated.

Keywords

Economic losses European purple loosestrife Lythrum salicaria Bog turtle Yellow star thistle Centaurea solstitialis European cheatgrass Bromus tectorum Exotic aquatic weeds Hydrilla verticillata Pistia stratiotes Eurasian watermilfoil Myriophyllum spicatum Yellow rocket Barberia vulgaris Canada thistle Cirsium arvense US Crop losses 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Pimentel
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell UniversityIthacaNY

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