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Facing Up to Workplace Bullying in the Context of Schools and Teaching

Chapter
Part of the International Handbooks of Religion and Education book series (IHRE, volume 3)

Abstract

Workplace bullying is a serious problem for educational and other workplaces. It involves the systematic erosion of a person’s capacity to contribute to the organisation in which they work. It is destructive and abusive behaviour that disempowers and discredits the target. It has devastating consequences for the individual target and for the organisation in which it occurs. Despite increasing recognition of the manifestations and effects of workplace bullying, many organisations for a variety of reasons respond inadequately and inappropriately to the problem. This chapter explores the many nuances of workplace bullying and attempts to dispel the prevalent myths and misconceptions associated with it. The chapter also examines the range of organisational responses that can effectively prevent or promote workplace bullying.

Keywords

Emotional Intelligence Emotional Abuse Abusive Behaviour Organisational Psychology Workplace Bully 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Independent Researcher and Consultant, School of Education StudiesD.C.U., 3 Pine Valley DriveRathfarnhamIreland

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