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Community Adult Learning Contributions to Social Sustainability in the Asia-South Pacific Region: The Role of ASPBAE

  • Bernie Lovegrove
  • Anne Morrison
Part of the Technical and Vocational Education and Training: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (TVET, volume 9)

Abstract

The Asian South Pacific Bureau of Adult Education (ASPBAE) is a non-government organization committed to promoting adult education throughout the Asia-South Pacific region. Many countries within this region are characterized by striking contrasts in access to, and distribution of, basic education and training opportunities. In partnership with regional and global educational and civic bodies, ASPBAE promotes social sustainability by advocating for the right of all individuals to an education that assists them to combat poverty and inequality, and that facilitates empowerment and transformation of individuals, groups, and communities. In this chapter, we provide an overview of ASPBAE’s activities followed by a case study, in order to highlight the organization’s contribution to social sustainability in the Asia-South Pacific region.

Keywords

Literacy Skill Member Organization Adult Literacy Adult Education Literacy Intervention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernie Lovegrove
    • 1
  • Anne Morrison
    • 1
  1. 1.Asian South Pacific Bureau of Adult Education (ASPBAE)ColabaIndia

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