Social and Economic Impacts of Land Titling Programs in Urban and Periurban Areas: A Short Review of the Literature

  • Geoffrey Payne
  • Alain Durand-Lasserve
  • Carole Rakodi

Abstract

Tenure has been increasingly identified as a key issue in managing the growth of urban areas and reducing urban poverty. In May 1999 the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) launched its Global Campaign for Secure Tenure to address the need to increase protection against forced evictions and promote longer-term options for secure tenure. Similarly, the Millennium Development Goals emphasize the impacts of insecure tenure and its links with poverty—and thus the role of secure tenure in poverty reduction—and Sclar and Garau (2003, p. 57) have argued that security of tenure is an effective tool for alleviating poverty in slums.

Keywords

Land Tenure Informal Settlement Urban Poor African City Land Market 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© World Bank 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geoffrey Payne
    • 1
  • Alain Durand-Lasserve
  • Carole Rakodi
  1. 1.Geoffrey Payne and Associates, Ealing CommonLondon

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