Advertisement

Making Urban Land Markets Work Better in South African Cities and Towns: Arguing the Basis for Access by the Poor

  • Mark Napier

Abstract

Despite a formidable land administration system and a strong land rights base, South African cities and towns continue to manifest the historical inequality of class and race in their spatial patterns of land use and ownership. This is reflected in, and reinforced by, unequal access to markets in land, housing, property in general, and development and use rights. This chapter discusses, at least in notional terms, in what balance market distortions and failures are to blame for the fact that the majority of the poor remain dislocated to the periurban fringes of cities and towns. It also addresses why it makes sense to open up access to well-located land through the market and government allocation.

Keywords

Informal Settlement Land Market State Allocation Market Distortion South African City 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Banking Association of South Africa. (2005a). Research into housing supply and functioning markets: Research, findings and conclusions. Report prepared by Settlement Dynamics Project Shop and Matthew Nell & Associates, Johannesburg.Google Scholar
  2. Banking Association of South Africa. (2005b). Research into housing supply and functioning markets: Resource report 7—Secondary markets. Report prepared by Settlement Dynamics Project Shop and Matthew Nell & Associates, Johannesburg.Google Scholar
  3. Biermann, S. (2006). A sustainable livelihood cost-benefit model to enhance the understanding of the dynamics between low income housing and location. Town and Regional Planning, December, 1–24. http://www.hdl.handle.net/10204/833
  4. Bobo, L., & Zubrinsky, C. L. (1996). Attitudes on residential integration: Perceived status differences, mere in-group preference, or racial prejudice? Social Forces, 74(3), 883–909.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Brown-Luthango, M. (2006). Capturing unearned value/leakages to assist markets to work for the poor. Paper commissioned by Urban LandMark. Accessed March 10, 2007, from http://www.urbanlandmark.org.za/archive.html
  6. Centre for Development Enterprise. (2005). Land reform in South Africa: A 21st century perspective. Research Report 14. Johannesburg: Author.Google Scholar
  7. Charlton, S. (2006). Making urban land markets work for the poor: Synthesis paper. Paper commissioned by Urban LandMark. Accessed March 10, 2007, from http://www.urbanlandmark.org.za/archive.html
  8. Colnot, S. (2003). There shall be houses and security for all. Master’s thesis, Delft University of Technology.Google Scholar
  9. Cross, C. (2006). Attacking urban poverty with housing: Toward more effective land markets. Paper commissioned by Urban LandMark. Accessed March 10, 2007, from http://www.urbanlandmark.org.za/archive.html
  10. Datta, K., & Jones, G. (2001). Housing and finance in developing countries: Invisible issues on research and policy agendas. Habitat International, 25(3), 333–357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. de Soto, H. (2000). The mystery of capital: Why capitalism triumphs in the West and fails everywhere else. London: Black Swan.Google Scholar
  12. Dean, W. (1971). Latifundia and land policy in nineteenth-century Brazil. Hispanic American Historical Review, 51(4), 606–625.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Dewar, D., & Uytenbogaardt, R. (1991). South African cities: A manifesto for change. Cape Town: Urban Problems Research Unit; Urban Foundation.Google Scholar
  14. DFID (U.K. Department for International Development). (2005, February). Making market systems work better for the poor (M4P): An introduction to the concept. Discussion paper prepared for Asian Development Bank and DFID learning event, Manila.Google Scholar
  15. Dowall, D. E. (1993, May). The role and function of urban land markets in market economies. Paper presented at the Ministry of Construction and Architecture, State Committee on Land Resources, and U.S. Agency for International Development workshop on privatization of land in Ukraine, Kiev.Google Scholar
  16. EProp. (2006). Sapoa to put figure on low-cost housing ratio. Accessed September 20, 2006, from http://www.eprop.co.za/news/article.aspx?idArticle=7842
  17. EProp. (2007). Council “undersold land by millions.” Accessed February 16, 2007, from http://www.eprop.co.za/news/article.aspx?idArticle=8451
  18. FinMark Trust. (2003). Workings of township residential property market: Findings, conclusions, and implications. Report prepared by Shisaka Management Services. Accessed October 17, 2006, from http://www.finmark.org.za
  19. First economy must help uplift its poorer fellow. (2004, June 4). Business Day (Johannesburg). from http://www.businessday.co.za/
  20. HSRC (Human Sciences Research Council). (2004). South African Regional Poverty Network readings on the second economy. Accessed June 30, 2004, from http://www.sarpn.org.za/documents/d0000830/index.php
  21. Huchzermeyer, M. (1999). Current informal settlement intervention in South Africa: Four case studies of people-driven initiatives. Cape Town: University of Cape Town, Department of Sociology.Google Scholar
  22. Kihato, M., & Berrisford, S. (2006). Regulatory systems and making urban land markets work for the poor in South Africa. Paper commissioned by Urban LandMark. Accessed March 10, 2007, from http://www.urbanlandmark.org.za/archive.html
  23. Kitchin, F. (2003, May). The “normalisation” of the SA city. Paper presented at the annual conference of the Association of American Geographers, New Orleans.Google Scholar
  24. Landman, K. (2005, November). Private space—”private citizen”: What kind of cities are we creating?Paper presented at the seminar Enclosed Communities: Property and Public Space in Post-Apartheid South Africa, Constitutional Hill, Johannesburg.Google Scholar
  25. Landman, K., & Ntombela, N. (2006). Opening up spaces for the poor in urban form: Trends, challenges and their implications for access to urban land. Paper commissioned by UrbanGoogle Scholar
  26. LandMark. Accessed March 10, 2007, from http://www.urbanlandmark.org.za/archive.html
  27. Lemon, A. (Ed.). (1991). Homes apart: South Africa’s segregated cities. Cape Town: David Philip Publishers.Google Scholar
  28. Mabin, A. (1992). Dispossession, exploitation and struggle: An historical overview of South African urbanisation. In D. M. Smith (Ed.), The apartheid city and beyond: Urbanisation and social change in South Africa(pp. 13–24). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  29. Maharaj, B. (1997). Apartheid, urban segregation and the local state: Durban and the Group Areas Act in South Africa. Urban Geography, 18(2), 135–154.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Marx, C. (2006). Conceptualising “the economy” to make urban land markets work for the poor. Paper commissioned by Urban LandMark. Accessed March 10, 2007, from http://www.urbanlandmark.org.za/archive.html
  31. Mbeki, T. (2004, May). Address of the president of South Africa, Thabo Mbeki, to the first joint sitting of the third democratic parliament (state of the nation address), Cape Town.Google Scholar
  32. McCarthy, J. (2006). Land use differentiation, class differentiation, housing and the urban land market: International and SA frameworks in MMW4P perspective. Paper commissioned by Urban LandMark. Accessed March 10, 2007, from http://www.urbanlandmark.org.za/archive.html
  33. Murphy, K. M., Shleifer, A., & Vishny, R. W. (1992). The transition to a market economy: Pitfalls of partial reform. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 107(3), 889–906.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Napier, M., Du Plessis, C., Meiklejohn, C., Vosloo, L., & Lungu-Mulenga, A. (1999). State of human settlements, South Africa 1994–1998. Report prepared for the South African Department of Housing. Pretoria: Department of Housing; Council for Scientific and Industrial Research.Google Scholar
  35. Napier, M., & Mothwa, M. (2001). Push and pull factors in the initiation and maintenance of home work in two Pretoria settlements: The myths and realities of South African home-based enterprises. Urban Forum, 12(3–4), 336–351.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Napier, M., & Ntombela, N. (2006). Towards effective state interventions to improve access by the poor to urban land markets. Paper presented at the World Conference on Accelerating Excellence in the Built Environment 2006, University of Wolverhampton, Birmingham, England.Google Scholar
  37. Payne, G. (2001). Urban land tenure policy options: Titles or rights? Habitat International, 25(3), 415–429.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Porteous, D. J. (2004). Making financial markets work for the poor. Paper commissioned by Fin- Mark Trust, Johannesburg.Google Scholar
  39. RDP houses not for renting. (2005, July 18). Johannesburg Star. Accessed November 2005 from http://www.thestar.co.za/
  40. Reintges, C. (1992). Urban (mis)management? A case study of the effects of orderly urbanisation on Duncan Village. In D. M. Smith (Ed.), The apartheid city and beyond: Urbanisation and social change in South Africa(pp. 99–109). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  41. Royston, L. (2006). Making urban land markets work for the poor in the context of existing local land access and transfer institutions. Paper commissioned by Urban LandMark. Accessed March 10, 2007, from http://www.urbanlandmark.org.za/archive.html
  42. Royston, L. (2007). Snakes and ladders: A housing perspective on de Soto and the first and second economy debate in South Africa. In Are Hernando de Soto’s views appropriate to South Africa?(pp. 32–43). P&DM Occasional Paper Series, no. 1. Johannesburg: University of the Witwatersrand, Graduate School of Public and Development Management.Google Scholar
  43. Rumney, R. (2005). Who owns South Africa: An analysis of state and private ownership patterns. In Human Sciences Research Council, State of the nation 2004–2005(pp. 401–422). Cape Town: HSRC Press.Google Scholar
  44. Rust, K. (2006). A finance response to the missing middle? ACCESS Housing, no. 4, 1–2. Accessed March 9, 2007, from http://www.finmark.org.za/
  45. Smit, D. (1999). Housing in South Africa: Significant government achievement based on public-private partnership. CDE Occasional Paper. Johannesburg: Centre for Development Enterprise.Google Scholar
  46. Smit, D. (2007). Inclusionary Housing Policy (IHP) in South Africa. Report prepared for the South African Department of Housing. Accessed March 15, 2007, from http://www.housing.gov.za
  47. Smith, D. M. (1987). Update: Apartheid in South Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  48. Smith, D. M. (Ed.). (1992). The apartheid city and beyond: Urbanisation and social change in South Africa. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  49. South Africa, Department of Finance. (2003, November). Budget speech by Minister of Finance Trevor Manuel to the National Assembly. Accessed June 30, 2004, from http://www.sarpn.org.za/documents/d0000830/index.php
  50. South Africa, Department of Housing. (2004a). A comprehensive plan for the development of sustainable human settlements. Cabinet memorandum tabled in August 2004. Pretoria: Author.Google Scholar
  51. South Africa, Department of Housing. (2004b, July). Minister’s speech at the People’s Summit on Land and Housing, Midrand. Accessed August 1, 2004, from http://www.housing.gov.za
  52. South Africa, Department of Housing. (2004c, June). Speech by Minister of Housing L. N. Sisulu at the occasion of the tabling of the budget vote for the Department of Housing for the 2004/2005 financial year, Cape Town. Accessed October 2, 2006, from http://www.housing.gov.za
  53. South Africa, Department of Housing. (2007). Housing delivery statistics as of December 2006. Accessed March 10, 2007, from http://www.housing.gov.za
  54. South Africa, Department of Trade and Industry. (2007). Property sector charter on black economic empowerment. Republic of South Africa Government Gazette, Notice 1248 of 2007, from http://www.propertycharter.co.za/
  55. South Africa, Department of Transport. (1999). Moving South Africa: A transport strategy for 2020. Accessed December 7, 2000, from http://www.transport.gov.za/projects/msa/index.html
  56. South African Parliament. (2007). Ministry media briefing, 15 February 2007 social cluster 1: Health, housing, water and sanitation. Cape Town: Author.Google Scholar
  57. South Africa, Office of the President. (2003). Towards a ten year review: Synthesis report on implementation of government programmes. Discussion document. Pretoria: Author.Google Scholar
  58. Statistics South Africa. (1999). October household survey, 1999. Pretoria: Author.Google Scholar
  59. Swanson, M. W. (1968). Urban origins of separate development. Race & Class, 10(1), 31–40. (Oxford University Press for Institute of Race Relations)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Swilling, M., Humphries, R., & Shubane, K. (Eds.). (1991). Apartheid city in transition. Cape Town: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  61. Tomlinson, M. (2005, August 10). Title deeds not a magic wand. Business Day(Johannesburg). from http://www.businessday.co.za/
  62. UN-Habitat (United Nations Human Settlements Programme). (2006). Law and land tenure review: Brazil. Nairobi: Author.Google Scholar
  63. Wallace, J., & Williamson, I. (2006). Building land markets. Land Use Policy, 23(2), 123–135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. World Bank. (2006). Fourth urban research symposium 2007: Urban land use and land markets— Call for papers. Circular dated July 25. World Bank, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© World Bank 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Napier
    • 1
  1. 1.Urban LandmarkTshwaneSouth Africa

Personalised recommendations