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Dynamic-Receive Focusing with High-Frequency Annular Arrays

  • J.A. Ketterling
  • J. Mamou
  • R.H. Silverman
Part of the Acoustical Imaging book series (ACIM, volume 29)

Abstract

High-frequency ultrasound is commonly employed for ophthalmic and small-animal imaging because of the fine-resolution images it affords. Annular arrays allow improved depth of field and lateral resolution versus commonly used single-element, focused transducers. The best image quality from an annular array is achieved by using synthetic transmit-to-receive focusing while utilizing data from all transmit-to-receive element combinations. However, annular arrays must be laterally scanned to form an image and this requires one pass for each of the array elements when implementing full synthetic transmit-to-receive focusing. A dynamic-receive focusing approach permits a single pass, although at a sacrifice of depth of field and lateral resolution. A five-element, 20-MHz annular array is examined to determine the acoustic beam properties for synthetic and dynamic-receive focusing. A spatial impulse response model is used to simulate the acoustic beam properties for each focusing case and then data acquired from a human eye-bank eye are processed to demonstrate the effect of each approach on image quality.

Key words

Annular array High-frequency ultrasound Beamforming Ophthalmic imaging 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • J.A. Ketterling
    • 1
  • J. Mamou
    • 1
  • R.H. Silverman
    • 2
  1. 1.Riverside Research InstituteFrederic L. Lizzi Center for Biomedical EngineeringNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Weill Medical College of Cornell UniversityNew YorkUSA

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