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Tissue Thermal Property Reconstruction by Stopping Heating And Perfusion

  • C. Sumi
  • T. Uchida
  • T. Ooba
  • K. Inoue
Part of the Acoustical Imaging book series (ACIM, volume 29)

Abstract

In this paper, we report robust noninvasive techniques for reconstructing the thermal properties of living tissues, such as thermal conductivity, thermal capacity and thermal diffusivity, for the diagnosis, monitoring and planning of thermal treatments such as high-intensity focus ultrasound (HIFU). Internal tissue temperature distributions can be measured using ultrasonic imaging or magnetic resonance imaging. Provided that the reference thermal properties of living tissues are given in the region of interest (ROI) as initial conditions, we can determine thermal property distributions by solving bioheat transfer equations as simultaneous first-order partial differential equations having temperature distributions as inhomogeneous coefficients. By using the reported technique, the perfusion by blood flow and thermal sources or sinks can also be reconstructed. However, in this study, we perform reconstruction after stopping heating and perfusion; only the thermal properties of living tissues can be reconstructed under such conditions. Simulations were conducted to verify the feasibility of the reconstruction. A minimally invasive thermal treatment will be realized by using our proposed reconstruction technique.

Key words

Thermal property reconstruction Ultrasound Temperature measurement Thermal conductivity Thermal capacity Thermal diffusivity Thermal source Perfusion Thermal treatment HIFU Minimally invasive treatment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Sumi
    • 1
  • T. Uchida
    • 1
  • T. Ooba
    • 1
  • K. Inoue
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Electronics EngineeringSophia UniversityTokyoJapan

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