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Z-contrast STEM 3D Information by Abel transform in Systems with Rotational Symmetry

  • V Grillo
  • E Carlino
  • L Felisari
  • L Manna
  • L Carbone
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Physics book series (SPPHY, volume 120)

Summary

Image tomography of clusters, in transmission electron microscopy, is a recent and highly interesting field of study for its capability to explore the 3-dimensional shape and the structure of nanoparticles. Z-contrast imaging is an ideal technique, for nanometre scale tomography, and could give also 3-dimensional information on the variation in the chemical composition within the particles. Unfortunately, 3-dimensional reconstruction, with high-resolution information, requires time-consuming series of high-resolution images and long data analysis times. Here, it is shown how 3D reconstructions can be obtained from a single high resolution Z-contrast image, if the particle under study has a rotational symmetry. In this case, the reconstruction can be performed by using a procedure based on the Abel's integral. Here, the method is explained and applied to simulated and experimental images of core-shell nanocrystals, showing the capability of detecting compositional variation as distinct from particle thickness variation.

Keywords

Rotational Symmetry Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Simulated Image Core Shell Particle High Angle Annular Dark Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • V Grillo
    • 1
  • E Carlino
    • 1
  • L Felisari
    • 1
  • L Manna
    • 1
    • 2
  • L Carbone
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratorio Nazionale TASC, INFM-CNR, Area Science ParkTriesteItaly
  2. 2.National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-INFMLecceItaly

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