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Soil-plant Transfer of Organic Chemicals and Derivation of Trigger Values

  • Konstantin Terytze
  • Werner Kördel
  • Monika Herrchen
  • Ines Vogel
  • Angelika Nestler
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series book series (NAPSC)

The Federal Soil Protection Act [Anonymus, 1998 was technically realized by the Federal Soil Protection and Contaminated Sites Ordinance (BbodSchv) of July 12th, 1999. Precautionary values and trigger values as laid down in the Law are an important instrument to realise its requirements. Trigger values are related to various soil uses and objectives of protection, which are “human health, “quality of food and feed”, and “leachate to groundwater”. Any procedure to derive trigger values for the objective “quality of food and feed” has to consider the soil-plant transfer of chemicals for soils under agricultural use and household gardens. Thus, the production function of soil is taken into account.

The exact procedure to obtain trigger values for “quality of food and feed” is explained.

By this means, trigger values for “quality of food and feed” already were derived for some metal compounds, namely arsenic, lead, mercury and thallium. Beside metal compounds several organic substances are also of priority; for example, a trigger value for benzo(a)pyrene and an action value for PCBs has to be defined.

The pathway soil-plant is a sensible exposure route due to potential accumulation in the food chain.

A summary on the methodology and results of trigger value derivation for some selected organic chemicals previously used as pesticides and of different data sizes with respect to the soil-plant transfer process is given.

Keywords

soil-plant transfer of organic substances precaution levels trigger levels action levels 

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References

  1. Anonymous (1998): Federal Soil Protection Act of March 17th 1998 (Federal Law Gazette I, p. 502)Google Scholar
  2. Anonymous (1999a): BBodSchV - Federal Soil Protection and Contaminated Sites Ordinance dated July, 12th, 1999 (BGBl. I 1999 S. 1554)Google Scholar
  3. Anonymous (1999b): Promulgation of Methods and Standards for Derivation of Trigger Values and Action Values pursuant to the Federal Ordinance on Soil Protection and Contaminated Sites (Bundes-Bodenschutz- und Altlastenverordnung (BBodSchV)), Federal Bulletin No. 161a, August 28Google Scholar
  4. Anonymous (1999c): Gefährdungsabschätzung von Umweltschadstoffen. Toxikologische Basisdaten und ihre Bewertung. T. Eikmann, U. Heinrich, B. Heinzow und R. Konietzka (eds.), Loseblattsammlung im Erich Schmidt VerlagGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Konstantin Terytze
    • 1
  • Werner Kördel
    • 3
  • Monika Herrchen
    • 3
  • Ines Vogel
    • 1
  • Angelika Nestler
    • 2
  1. 1.Federal Environment Agency of GermanyGermany
  2. 2.Free University of BerlinGermany
  3. 3.Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied EcologyGermany

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