Macromolecular Transport in Arterial Walls: Current and Future Directions

  • K. Khanafer
  • K. Vafai
Part of the Theory and Applications of Transport in Porous Media book series (TATP, volume 22)

abstract

Relevant mathematical models associated with the transport of macromolecules in the blood stream and in the arterial walls are reviewed in this work. A robust four-layer model (endothelium, intima, internal elastic lamina and media) based on porous media concept and accounting for selective permeability of each porous layer to certain solutes is presented to describe the transport of macromolecules in the arterial wall coupled with the transport in the lumen. The variances in the current models are analyzed and discussed. Future direction in developing a rigorous mathematical model for transport in arterial walls using porous media theory and fluid-structure interaction approach is outlined in this study.

Keywords

Cholesterol Permeability Porosity Hydrolysis Convection 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Khanafer
    • 1
  • K. Vafai
    • 2
  1. 1.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.University of CaliforniaRiversideUSA

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