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Introduction

  • Alberto Troccoli
  • Mike Harrison
  • David L. T. Anderson
  • Simon J. Mason
Conference paper
  • 644 Downloads
Part of the NATO Science Series book series (NAIV, volume 82)

Humanity recognised millennia ago the importance of climate variability to the sustenance of life, whether that variability was expressed in the form of droughts, floods, heat, cold, or wind. Coping strategies, developed to handle the consequences of climate variability, helped ensure mankind’s survival, although the historic record indicates that not all societies successfully overcame past challenges imposed by long-term droughts, extensive flooding, and the like. Early coping strategies included migration, invasion, appropriation and storage. In addition many, probably most, perhaps all, societies developed indigenous knowledge or belief systems that they felt enabled them to foresee or control those elements of the climate that are so critical for maintaining water and food supplies.

Keywords

Climate Variability Indigenous Knowledge Tropical Indian Ocean Climate Information World Meteorological Organization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alberto Troccoli
    • 1
  • Mike Harrison
    • 2
  • David L. T. Anderson
    • 1
  • Simon J. Mason
    • 3
  1. 1.European Centre for Medium Range Weather ForecastsShinfield ParkUK
  2. 2.Independent ConsultantWolverton CommonUK
  3. 3.International Research Institute for Climate and SocietyPalisadesUSA

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