Large-Scale Movements of Large Herbivores Livestock following changes in seasonal forage supply

  • Randall B. Boone
  • Shauna B. Burnsilver
  • Jeffrey S. Worden
  • Kathleen A. Galvin
  • N. Thompson Hobbs
Part of the Wageningen UR Frontis Series book series (WURF, volume 23)

Large-scale movements allow large herbivores to cope with changes in seasonal forage supply. Pastoralists use mobility to convert low-value ephemeral forage into high-value livestock. Transhumant pastoralists may move livestock less than ten to hundreds of kilometres. In semi-arid tropical sites, water and forage shortages in the dry season cause pastoral livestock to move to water or key resource areas. In temperate summers, livestock may be moved to higher-elevation snow-free meadows. In winters, animals may be moved lower to warmer sites, or to mountain valleys protected from steppe winds. Despite the recognised value of mobility, pastoral mobility is being reduced around the world. Changes in the mobility of three pastoral groups are reviewed, the Aymara of the South-American highlands, Mongolians, and the Maasai of Kenya and Tanzania, for which quantitative results are given. The Maasai of Kajiado District, Kenya are subdividing some group ranches into individually owned parcels. In subdivided Osilalei Group Ranch, herders moved an average of 5.6 km per day, whereas in undivided northern Imbirikani, herders moved 12.5 km per day.

Keywords

Aymara fragmentation Kenya Maasai Mongolia pastoralism subdivision 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Randall B. Boone
    • 1
  • Shauna B. Burnsilver
    • 1
  • Jeffrey S. Worden
    • 1
  • Kathleen A. Galvin
    • 1
  • N. Thompson Hobbs
    • 1
  1. 1.Natural Resource Ecology LaboratoryColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

Personalised recommendations