US Coral Reefs in the Line and Phoenix Islands, Central Pacific Ocean: History, Geology, Oceanography, and Biology

  • James Maragos
  • Joyce Miller
  • Jamison Gove
  • Edward De Martini
  • Alan M. Friedlander
  • Scott Godwin
  • Craig Musburger
  • Molly Timmers
  • Roy Tsuda
  • Peter Vroom
  • Elizabeth Flint
  • Emily Lundblad
  • Jonathan Weiss
  • Paula Ayotte
  • Enric Sala
  • Stuart Sandin
  • Sarah McTee
  • Todd Wass
  • Daria Siciliano
  • Russell Brainard
  • David Obura
  • Scott Ferguson
  • Bruce Mundy
Part of the Coral Reefs of the World book series (CORW, volume 1)

Pacific remote island areas (PRIA) are sovereign United States unincorporated and unorganized territories not falling within the jurisdiction of any other US territory or State (GAO 1997; US DOI 2003). There are eight PRIA and all are under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Interior (DOI). All are low reef islets or atolls in the central Pacific Ocean. Table 15.1 and Fig. 15.1 present the size, location, and regional geography of the five PRIA that are the primary focus in this chapter: Baker and Howland Islands in the Phoenix Islands ; and Jarvis Island, Kingman Reef, and Palmyra Atoll in the Line Islands. All five are located between Hawai’i and Samoa and are National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) administered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The remaining three PRIA: Johnston Atoll NWR, Midway Atoll NWR, and Wake Atoll, are the subject of other chapters in this volume (Chapter 13, Rooney et al.; Chapter 17, Lobel and Lobel). Johnston Atoll is mentioned in this chapter because it is geologically part of the Line Islands archipelago. Wake Atoll, administered by the US.

Air Force, is north of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Midway Atoll is located at the northwest end of the Hawaiian Islands and is a PRIA because it was excluded from state jurisdiction in the Hawaii Statehood Act of 1959. This chapter covers the cultural, geological, and biophysical characteristics and history of the five PRIA. The following chapter (Chapter 16, Maragos et al.) covers the status, threats and significance of the five PRIA.

Keywords

Drilling Beach Sponge Cyclone Gravel 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Maragos
    • 1
  • Joyce Miller
    • 2
  • Jamison Gove
    • 2
  • Edward De Martini
    • 3
  • Alan M. Friedlander
    • 4
  • Scott Godwin
    • 5
  • Craig Musburger
    • 6
  • Molly Timmers
    • 2
  • Roy Tsuda
    • 7
  • Peter Vroom
    • 2
  • Elizabeth Flint
    • 1
  • Emily Lundblad
    • 2
  • Jonathan Weiss
    • 2
  • Paula Ayotte
    • 8
  • Enric Sala
    • 9
  • Stuart Sandin
    • 9
  • Sarah McTee
    • 6
  • Todd Wass
    • 2
  • Daria Siciliano
    • 10
  • Russell Brainard
    • 3
  • David Obura
    • 11
  • Scott Ferguson
    • 12
  • Bruce Mundy
    • 3
  1. 1.Pacific Remote Islands National Wildlife Refuge ComplexU.S. Fish and Wildlife ServiceHonoluluUSA
  2. 2.Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric ResearchNOAA Pacific Island Science CenterHonoluluUSA
  3. 3.NOAA Pacific Island Science CenterHonoluluUSA
  4. 4.Biogeography Team & The Oceanic InstituteWaimanaloUSA
  5. 5.Hawaii Institute of Marine BiologyUniversity of HawaiiKaneoheUSA
  6. 6.Department of ZoologyUniversity of HawaiiHonoluluUSA
  7. 7.Natural SciencesBernice P. Bishop MuseumHonoluluUSA
  8. 8.Marine Sciences DepartmentUniversity of HawaiiHiloUSA
  9. 9.Center for Marine Biodiversity and ConservationScripps Institution of OceanographyLa JollaUSA
  10. 10.Physics DepartmentNaval Postgraduate SchoolMontereyUSA
  11. 11.CORDIO East AfricaKenyatta Public BeachKenya
  12. 12.Coral Reef Ecosystem DivisionPacific Islands Fisheries Science CenterHonoluluUSA

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