Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor and Angiogenesis

Therapeutic Implications
  • Juan Amaral
  • S. Patricia Becerra

Abstrat

Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), an extracelullar glycoprotein of 50 kDa, is one of the main anti-angiogenic factors of the eye. Its main source is the retinal pigment epithelium, from which the mature protein is secreted in a polarized fashion toward the retina. PEDF is present at high concentrations in the interphotoreceptor matrix, the vitreous and the aqueous humor. Pathologies like retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration lead to severe visual loss due to neovessel formation and are accompanied by decreases in PEDF levels during their active phase. Pathological generation of blood vessels is also a key component of the growth and spread of tumors. Two of the main steps in the process of angiogenesis are endothelial cell migration and proliferation. PEDF has been shown to inhibit both, and to induce apoptotic endothelial cell death. These observations have led to its use as an anti-angiogenic substance, not only in animal models of eye diseases but also in clinical trials. Viral-mediated gene transfer, genetically engineered cells, and protein delivery systems located in the periocular or intraocular compartments are used to deliver PEDF to its target. PEDF is well tolerated and targets only new vessel formation. This chapter discusses the effects of PEDF in angiogenic models and the different approaches used in its delivery for the treatment of angiogenic eye diseases.

Keywords

Permeability Ischemia Heparin Polypeptide Glucocorticoid 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juan Amaral
    • 1
  • S. Patricia Becerra
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Retinal Cell and Molecular BiologyNational Eye Institute,National Institutes of HealthBethesda

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