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Human Interactions

  • Nick Kanas
  • Dietrich Manzey
Part of the The Space Technology Library book series (SPTL, volume 22)

Keywords

International Space Station Space Mission Leader Support Mission Control Total Mood Disturbance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nick Kanas
    • 1
  • Dietrich Manzey
    • 2
  1. 1.San Francisco and Department of Veterans Affairs Medical CenterProfessor of Psychiatry University of California/San FranciscoSan FranciscoU.S.A
  2. 2.Professor of Work Engineering and Organizational Psychology Department of Psychology and ErgonomicsBerlin Institute of TechnologyBerlinGermany

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