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The Turing Test

Mapping and Navigating the Debate
  • Robert E. Horn

Abstract

The structure of the Turing Test debates has been diagrammed into seven large posters containing over 800 major claims, rebuttals, and counterrebuttals. This “mapping” of the debates is explained and discussed.

Keywords

Argumentation maps can computers think debates Turing Test 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert E. Horn
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford University and Saybrook Graduate SchoolUSA

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