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Functional Study of PS II and PS I Energy Use and Dissipation Mechanisms in Barley Wild Type and Chlorina Mutants Under High Light Conditions

  • Marian Brestic
  • Marek Zivcak
  • Katarina Olsovska
  • Jana Repkova

Abstract

In the experiments with spring barley, wild type (cv. Kompakt) and antenna mutants (chlorina f2, 104) the photosynthetic reactions of plants were studied under high light conditions based on the measurements of changes in energy use and distribution between PSII and PSI and dissipation mechanisms evoked by high light treatment. The results show the similar responses of wild type and chlorina 104 in the electron transport rate, effective quantum yield of PSII, non-photochemical quenching as well as the net CO2 assimilation rate as compared to chlorina f2, which was more prone to photoinhibition due to the restricted ability to form cyclic electron transport at higher light intensities. This may explain to a decisive extent a low non-photochemical quenching which is usually co- generated by cyclic electron transport.

Keywords

Barley antenna mutants chlorophyll fluorescence cyclic electron transport photoinhibition 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marian Brestic
    • 1
  • Marek Zivcak
    • 1
  • Katarina Olsovska
    • 1
  • Jana Repkova
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant PhysiologySlovak University of AgricultureNitraSlovakia

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