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Electromagnetic Frequency Spectra of Samples Placed in a Coil That Senses the Electromagnetic Background Field: Application for Leaves, Chloroplasts and Molecules Useful in Photosynthesis

  • Vasilij Goltsev
  • Merope Tsimilli-Michael
  • Petko Chernev
  • Ivelina Zaharieva
  • Margarita Kouzmanova
  • Reto Jorg Strasser
Conference paper

Abstract

We Are Continuously Surrounded By An Electromagnetic Field Which Can Be Picked Up By A Conducting Coil And Stored In A Computer For Further Analysis. This Field Is An Electromagnetic Background Noise. The Aim Of The Current Work Is To Clarify Whether The Presence Of Dissolved Molecules/ Water Systems Placed In The Detecting Coil Can Be Registered With Physical Methods And Analyzed Mathematically. We Designed An Experimental Setup That Included A Sensitive Coil And A Signal Amplifier In Order To Register The Electromagnetic Field With And Without Water Solutions And Living Plant Objects. The Electrical Signal Was Recorded By A 24-Bit Sound Card Of A Laptop Computer And Was Analyzed By The Wavelab 4.0 Computer Software. By A Fast Fourier Transformation The Signal Was Translated Into The Frequency Domain In The Range From 20 Hz To 20 Khz. The Resulted Electromagnetic Spectra Were Recorded In The Presence Of Several Photosynthetically Active Compounds (Modifying The Electron Transfer Reactions): The Electron Acceptors 2,6-Dichlorophenol-Indophenol, Potassium Ferricyanide And Methylviologen, And The Inhibitor 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1,1-Dimethylurea. The Difference Spectra (The Spectrum Of The Solution Minus The Spectrum Of Water) Of All Chemicals Or Thylakoid Suspension Show The Existence Of Different Maxima In The Frequency Range From 20 To 500 Hz Which Seem To Be Specific For The Given Material Placed Into The Coil.

Keywords

Electromagnetic frequency spectra photosynthetic electron transfer method 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vasilij Goltsev
    • 1
  • Merope Tsimilli-Michael
    • 2
    • 3
  • Petko Chernev
    • 1
  • Ivelina Zaharieva
    • 1
  • Margarita Kouzmanova
    • 1
  • Reto Jorg Strasser
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biophysics and Radiobiology, Biological FacultyUniversity of SofiaSofiaBulgaria
  2. 2.Bioenergetics LaboratoryUniversity of GenevaJussy-GenevaSwitzerland
  3. 3.NicosiaCyprus

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