CITY:mobil: A Model for Integration in Sustainability Research

  • Matthias Bergmann
  • Thomas Jahn

Abstract

The project ‘Strategies for a Sustainable Urban Mobility’ (‘Stadtverträgliche Mobilität – Handlungsstrategien für eine ökologisch und sozial verträgliche, ökonomisch effiziente Verkehrsentwicklung in Stadtregionen’) is a good example of successful integration work. Researchers from a number of different disciplines, as well as planners from two model cities, formed the research group CITY:mobil and cooperated within this project to develop innovative research methods, on the one hand, and planning tools aimed at a more sustainable mobility in cities, on the other. The project was designed to integrate planning and technical aspects as well as economic, ecological and social goals. Thus, the rather complex task of knowledge integration and social integration by the project team was one of the central challenges within the research process. Therefore, after introducing the details of this specific research project, we conclude with a universal model for a transdisciplinary research process. This model can support researchers in planning and conducting the complex integration demands to meet the dual targets of integrated research results for the area of interest (i.e. the societal problems being the starting point of the research project), and of new interdisciplinary or disciplinary results (e.g. methods, concepts and theories).

Keywords

Sustainable mobility management Cognitive integration Boundary object Problem transformation Social-ecological research Societal relationships to nature 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Becker, E. and Jahn, Th.: 2003, Umrisse einer kritischen Theorie gesellschaftlicher Naturverhältnisse (Societal Relations to Nature. Outline of a Critical Theory in the Ecological Crisis). In: G. Böhme and A. Manzei (eds), Kritische Theorie der Technik und der Natur, München, Wilhelm Fink Verlag, pp. 91–112. Retrieved May 29, 2007, from http://www.isoe.de/ftp/darmstadttext_engl.pdf.Google Scholar
  2. Becker, E. and Jahn, Th.: 2006 (eds), Soziale Ökologie – Grundzüge einer Wissenschaft von den gesellschaftlichen Naturverhältnissen, Campus, Frankfurt.Google Scholar
  3. Becker, E., Jahn, Th., and Hummel, D.: 2006, Gesellschaftliche Naturverhältnisse. In: E. Becker and Th. Jahn (eds), Soziale Ökologie – Grundzüge einer Wissenschaft von den gesellschaftlichen Naturverhältnissen, Campus, Frankfurt, pp. 174–197.Google Scholar
  4. Bergmann, M., Brohmann, B., Hoffmann, E., Loibl, M.C., Rehaag, R., Schramm, E., and Voß, J.-P.: 2005, Quality Criteria of Transdisciplinary Research. A Guide for the Formative Evaluation of Research Projects. ISOE Studientexte Nr. 13. ISOE, Frankfurt.Google Scholar
  5. Bergmann, M. and Jahn, Th.: 1999, “Learning not only by doing” – Erfahrungen eines interdisziplinären Forschungsverbundes am Beispiel von “CITY:mobil”. In: J. Friedrichs and K. Hollaender (eds), Stadtökologische Forschung – Theorie und Anwendungen, Analytica, Berlin, pp. 251–275.Google Scholar
  6. Bergmann, M., Schramm, E., and Wehling, P.: 1999, Kritische Technologiefolgenabschätzung und Handlungsfolgenabschätzung – TA-orientierte Bewertungsverfahren zwischen stadtökologischer Forschung und kommunaler Praxis. In: J. Friedrichs and K. Hollaender (eds), Stadtökologische Forschung – Theorie und Anwendungen, Analytica, Berlin, pp. 443–463.Google Scholar
  7. CITY:mobil: 1998, Stadtwege, Planungsleitfaden für Stadtverträgliche Mobilität in Kommunen, Freiburg, Frankfurt.Google Scholar
  8. CITY:mobil (ed.): 1999, Stadtverträgliche Mobilität, Analytica, Berlin.Google Scholar
  9. Götz, K.: 1999, Mobilitätsstile – Folgerungen für ein zielgruppenspezifisches Marketing. In: J. Friedrichs and K. Hollaender (eds), Stadtökologische Forschung – Theorie und Anwendungen, Analytica, Berlin, pp. 299–326.Google Scholar
  10. Götz, K and Jahn, Th.: 1998, Mobility Models and Traffic Behaviour – An Empirical Social-Ecological Research Project. In: J. Breuste, H. Feldmann, and O. Uhlmann (eds), Urban Ecology. Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig UFZ, BMBF. Springer, Berlin, pp. 551–556.Google Scholar
  11. Jahn, Th.: 2005, Soziale Ökologie, Kognitive Integration und Transdisziplinarität, Technikfolgenabschätzung – Theorie und Praxis 14, 2, 32–38.Google Scholar
  12. Jahn, Th. and Wehling, P.: 1998, A Multidimensional Concept of Mobility – A New Approach to Urban Transportation Research and Planning. In: J. Breuste, H. Feldmann, and O. Uhlmann. (eds), Urban Ecology, Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig UFZ, BMBF. Springer, Berlin, pp. 523–527.Google Scholar
  13. Jahn, Th. and Wehling, P.: 1999, Das mehrdimensionale Mobilitätskonzept – Ein theoretischer Rahmen für die stadtökologische Mobilitätsforschung. In: J. Friedrichs and K. Hollaender (eds), Stadtökologische Forschung – Theorie und Anwendungen, Analytica, Berlin, pp. 127–141.Google Scholar
  14. Klein, J.T.: 2003, Thinking about Interdisciplinarity – A Primer for Practice, Colorado School of Mines Quarterly 103, 1, 101–114.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthias Bergmann
    • 1
  • Thomas Jahn
  1. 1.Institute for Social-Ecological Research (ISOE)Germany

Personalised recommendations