The Nature of Teaching and Learning in Self-Study*

  • Anthony Clarke
  • Gaalen Erickson
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 12)

Abstract

Understanding the relationship between teaching and learning is essential to an appreciation of self-study as a field of inquiry in its own right. The individual research trajectories in the fields of teaching and learning, particularly in recent years, illustrate su3cient common ground to support the contention that enhanced teaching practice is dependent upon teachers problematizing the ways and contexts in which they learn and make sense of that practice. While this shift, and its current recognition within the academy, is cause for celebration, we suggest that teachers’ problematizing their practice is a not new phenomenon. Indeed, we argue that Schwab was only partly correct when he characterized teaching as having four commonplaces. We contend that self-study is, and always has been, the fifth commonplace and, as such, is the cornerstone of professional practice. Without self-study teaching becomes repetitive not reflective – merely the duplication of models and strategies learned elsewhere and brought to bear unproblem-atically in one’s own classroom. Tracing the interconnectedness between teaching, learning, and self-study is instructive for appreciating how inquiry is construed, defined, and enacted within the profession.

Keywords

Coherence Posit Leaching Arena Metaphor 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony Clarke
    • 1
  • Gaalen Erickson
    • 2
  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaCanada
  2. 2.University of British ColumbiaCanada

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