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Revisioning And Recreating Practice: Collaboration In Self-Study*

  • Francçoise Bodone
  • Hafdís Guojónsdóttir
  • Mary C Dalmau
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 12)

Abstract

Francçoise Self-study research is situated within the discourses of the social construction of knowledge, reflective practice and action for social change. The strong presence of collaboration in the practice of self-study of teacher education is a natural response to this ethical and theoretical location. Collaborative agencyis the term that best expressed the way we saw educators using collaboration to make a difference to the outcomes and understanding at all stages of self-study research. We subdivided the many examples into three types of action: (1) Establishing the conditions of research; (2) Creating educational knowledge; and, (3) Recreating teacher education. This chapter explores the discourse of collaboration in self-study from three interconnected vantage points: Section 1invites readers to share our process as we prepared to critically review the literature; Section 2includes an overview of the public discourse of self-study; and, Section 3concludes with our assessment of key collaboration related questions that are emerging in the self-study of teacher education community. The chapter begins with anecdotes that situate and personalize the presence of collaboration in self-study research, and is enriched throughout by the words of current self-study researchers.

Keywords

Teacher Education Knowledge Creation American Educational Research Association Critical Friend Collaborative Dialogue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francçoise Bodone
    • 1
  • Hafdís Guojónsdóttir
    • 2
  • Mary C Dalmau
    • 3
  1. 1.Independent International ScholarFrance
  2. 2.Iceland University of EducationIceland
  3. 3.Victoria University of TechnologyAustralia

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