A Survey of Coarse-Grain Reconfigurable Architectures and Cad Tools

Basic Definitions, Critical Design Issues and Existing Coarse-grain Reocnfigurable Systems
  • G. Theodoridis
  • D. Soudris
  • S. Vassiliadis

According to the granularity of configuration, reconfigurable systems are classified in two categories, which are the fine- and coarse-grain ones. The purpose of this chapter is to study the features of coarse-grain reconfigurable systems, to examine their advantages and disadvantages, to discuss critical design issues that must be addressed during their development, and to present representative coarse-grain reconfigurable systems that have been proposed in the literature.

Keywords

Coarse-grain reconfigurable systems/architectures design issues of coarse-grain reconfigurable systems mapping/compilation methods reconfiguration mechanisms 

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© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Theodoridis
  • D. Soudris
  • S. Vassiliadis

There are no affiliations available

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