Aspects of Educational Transfer

  • David Phillips
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 22)

There has always been much agonising and disagreement about the definition, purpose, and methods of comparative education. But there might be general agreement on one thing, namely, that among the aims of comparative inquiry in education should be the intention to learn from the foreign experience, to identify aspects of educational provision ‘elsewhere’ that might serve as lessons for the ‘home’ situation, that might be ‘borrowed’ or ‘copied’, ‘emulated’, ‘imported’, ‘appropriated’ — the vocabulary is both diverse and in various ways problematic — that might result, in Michael Sadler's words, ‘in our being better fitted to understand our own [system]’ (Sadler, 1900, in Higginson, 1979).

The idea that policy and practice might be ‘borrowed’ or ‘transferred’ from other locations has, then, been a continuing theme — both enthusiastically embraced and dismissed as a simplistic notion — since the early days of comparative inquiry in education.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adams, J. Q. (1804). Letters on Silesia, written during a tour through that country in the years 1800–1801. London: J. Budd.Google Scholar
  2. Barnard, H. (1861). German schools and pedagogy: Organization and instruction of common schools in Germany, with the views of German teachers and educators on elementary instruction. New York: F.C. Brownell.Google Scholar
  3. Barnard, H. (1876). German pedagogy: Education, the school, and the teacher, in German literature. Hartford.Google Scholar
  4. Beech, J. (2005). International agencies, educational discourse, and the reform of teacher education in Argentina and Brazil (1985–2002): A comparative analysis, unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of London.Google Scholar
  5. Beech, J. (2006a). The theme of educational transfer in comparative education: A view over time. Research in Comparative and International Education,.1(.1), 2–13.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Beech, J. (2006b). Redefining educational transfer: International agencies and the (re)production of educational ideas. In J. Sprogøe & T. Winther-Jensen (Eds.), Identity, education and citizenship — Multiple interrelations (pp. 175–196). Frankfurt am Main, etc.: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  7. Caruso, M. (2004). Locating educational authority: Teaching monitors, educational meanings and the importing of pedagogical models, Spain and the German States in the nineteenth century., In D. Phillips & K. Ohs (Eds.), Educational policy borrowing: Historical perspectives (pp.59–87). Didcot: Symposium.Google Scholar
  8. Caruso, M., & H. -E. Tenorth (Eds.) (2002). Internationalisierung: Semantik und bildungssystem in vergleichender perspektive. Frankfurt am Main, etc.: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  9. Cousin, V. (1864). Report on the state of public instruction in Prussia. London: Effingham Wilson.Google Scholar
  10. Cowen, R. (2006). Acting comparatively upon the educational world: Puzzles and possibilities. Oxford Review of Education, 32(5), 561–573.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Ertl, H. (Ed.) (2006). Cross-national attraction in education. Accounts from England and Germany. Didcot: Symposium.Google Scholar
  12. Finegold, D., McFarland, L. & Richardson, W. (Eds.) (1993). Something borrowed, something learned? The transatlantic market in education and training reform. Washington, D.C.: The Brooking Institution.Google Scholar
  13. Fraser, S. (1964). Jullien's plan for comparative education, 1816–1817. New York: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  14. Gonon. P. (1998). Das internationale Argument in der Bildungsreform. Bern: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  15. Grégoire, R. (1967). Vocational education (p. 34). Paris: OECD.Google Scholar
  16. Halls, W. D. (1990) (Ed.). Comparative education: Contemporary issues and trends. London: Jessica Kingsley/UNESCO.Google Scholar
  17. Hayden, M., Levy J., & Thompson J. (Eds.) (2006). The Sage handbook of research in international education. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  18. Higginson, J. H. (Ed.) (1979). Selections from Michael Sadler. Studies in world citizenship. Liverpool: Dejall & Meyorre.Google Scholar
  19. Holmes, B. (1965). Problems in education. A comparative approach. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  20. Holmes, B. (1981). Comparative education: Some considerations of method. London: Allen & Unwin.Google Scholar
  21. Howitt, W. (1844). German experiences. London: Longman, Brown, etc.Google Scholar
  22. Husén, T. (1989). The Swedish school reform — Exemplary both ways. Comparative Education, 25(3), 345–355.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Jansen, J. (2004). Importing outcomes-based education into South Africa: Policy borrowing in a post- Communist world. In D. Phillips & K. Ochs (Eds.), Educational policy borrowing: Historical perspectives. Didcot: Symposium.Google Scholar
  24. King, E. J. (1968). Comparative studies and educational decision. Indianapolis and New York: The Bobbs- Merrill Company.Google Scholar
  25. Kume K. (2002). The Iwakura embassy, 1871–73. A true account of the ambassador extraordinary & plenipotentiary's journey of observation through the United States of America and Europe, 4 volumes. Chiba (The Japan Documents).Google Scholar
  26. Matlin, S. (Ed.) (2003). Commonwealth education partnerships 2004, edited by S. Matlin, Commonwealth Secretariat, The Stationery Office.Google Scholar
  27. Murray, N. (1997). A life of Matthew Arnold. London: Sceptre.Google Scholar
  28. Noah, H. J., & Eckstein, M. A. (1969). Toward a science of comparative education. London: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  29. Ochs, K., & Phillips, D. (2002a). Towards a structural typology of cross-national attraction in education. Lisbon: Educa.Google Scholar
  30. Ochs, K., & Phillips, D. (2002b). Comparative studies and ‘cross-national attraction’ in education: A typology for the analysis of English interest in educational policy and provision in Germany. Educational Studies, 28(4), 325–339.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Ochs, K. (2005). Educational policy borrowing and its implications for reform and innovation: A study with specific reference to the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham. Unpublished D.Phil. thesis, University of Oxford.Google Scholar
  32. Ochs, K. (2006). Cross-national policy borrowing and educational innovation: Improving achievement in the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham. Oxford Review of Education, 32(5), 599–618.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Pattison, M. (1861). Report of the Rev. Mark Pattison, B.D., Reports of the assistant commissioners appointed to inquire into the state of popular education in England and Wales (The Newcastle report, pp. 161–266). London: HMSO. pp.161–266.Google Scholar
  34. Phillips, D. (1989). Neither a borrower nor a lender be? The problems of cross-national attraction in education, Comparative Education, 25(3), 267–274.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Phillips, D. (1993). Borrowing educational policy. In D. Finegold, L. McFarland & W. Richardson (Eds.), Something borrowed, something learned? The transatlantic market in education and training reform (pp. 13–19). Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution.Google Scholar
  36. Phillips, D. (1997). Prolegomena to a history of British interest in education in Germany. In C. Kodron et al. (Eds.), Vergleichende erziehungswissenschaft: Herausforderung — Vermittlung — Praxis. Cologne: Böhlau.Google Scholar
  37. Phillips, D. (2000a). Beyond travellers' tales: Some nineteenth-century British commentators on education in Germany. Oxford Review of Education, 26(1), 49–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Phillips, D. (2000b). Learning from elsewhere in education: Some perennial problems revisited with reference to British interest in Germany. Comparative Education, 36(3), 297–307.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Phillips, D. (2002). Reflections on British interest in education in Germany in the nineteenth century. (A Progress Report). Lisbon: Educa.Google Scholar
  40. Phillips, D. (2004). Toward a theory of policy attraction in education. In G. Steiner-Khamsi (Ed.), Lessons from elsewhere: The politics of educational borrowing and lending (pp. 54–67). New York: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  41. Phillips, D. (2005). Policy borrowing in education: Frameworks for analysis. In J. Zajda (Ed.), International handbook on globalisation, education and policy research (pp. 23–34). Springer.Google Scholar
  42. Phillips, D. (2006b). Investigating educational policy transfer. In M. Hayden, J. Levy & J. Thompson (Eds.), The Sage handbook of research in international education (pp. 450–461). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  43. Phillips, D. (Ed.) (2006c). Comparative inquiry and educational policy making, special issue of Oxford Review of Education, 32(5).Google Scholar
  44. Phillips, D., & Ochs, K. (2003a), Processes of policy borrowing in education: Some analytical and explanatory devices, Comparative Education, 39(4), 451–461.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Phillips, D., & Ochs, K. (2003b): Educational policy borrowing: Some questions for small states. In S. Matlin (Ed.), Commonwealth Education Partnerships 2004 (pp. 131–136). Commonwealth Secretariat, The Stationery Office.Google Scholar
  46. Phillips, D., & Ochs, K. (2004a). Researching policy borrowing: Some methodological challenges in comparative education, British Educational Research Journal, 30(6), 773–784.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Phillips, D., & Ochs, K. (Eds.) (2004b). Educational policy borrowing: Historical perspectives. Didcot: Symposium.Google Scholar
  48. Phillips, D., & Schweisfurth, M. (2006). Comparative and international education. An introduction to theory, method, and practice. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
  49. Rappleye, J. (2006). Theorising educational transfer: Towards a conceptual map of the context of cross- national attraction. Research in Comparative and International Education, 1(3). (www.wwwords. co.uk/RCIE)
  50. Report from Select Committee on the State of Education (1834). London: House of Commons.Google Scholar
  51. Schriewer, J. (1990). The method of comparison and the need for externalization: Methodological criteria and sociological concepts. In J. Schriewer & B. Holmes (Eds.), Theories and methods in comparative education (pp. 25–83). Frankfurt: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  52. Schriewer, J. (Ed.) (2000). Discourse formation in comparative education. Frankfurt am Main, etc.: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  53. Shibata, M. (2005). Japan and Germany under the U.S. occupation: A comparative study of the post-war education reform. Lanham, etc.: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
  54. Spreen, C. A. (2004). The vanishing origins of outcomes-based education., In D. Phillips & K. Ochs (Eds.), Educational policy borrowing: Historical perspectives (pp. 221–236). Didcot: Symposium.Google Scholar
  55. Sprigade, A. (2005). Where there is reform there is comparison. English interest in education abroad, 1800– 1839. Unpublished D.Phil. thesis, University of Oxford.Google Scholar
  56. Sprogøe, J. & Winther-Jensen T. (Eds.) (2006). Identity, education and citizenship — Multiple interrelations. Frankfurt am Main, etc.: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  57. Steiner-Khamsi, G. (2000). Transferring education, displacing reforms. In J. Schriewer (Ed.), Discourse formation in comparative education (pp.155–187). Frankfurt am Main, etc.: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  58. Steiner-Khamsi, G. (2002). Re-framing educational policy borrowing as a policy strategy. In M. Caruso & H. -E. Tenorth (Eds.), Internationalisierung: Semantik und bildungssystem in vergleichender perspektive (pp.57–89). Frankfurt am Main, etc.: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  59. Steiner-Khamsi, G. (Ed.) (2004). Lessons from elsewhere: The politics of educational borrowing and lending. New York: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  60. Steiner-Khamsi, G., & Quist, H. O. (2000). The politics of policy borrowing: Reopening the case of Achimota in British Ghana. Comparative Education Review. 44(3), 272–299.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Steiner-Khamsi, G. & Stolpe I. (2006). Educational import. Local encounters with global forces in Mongolia. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  62. Tanaka, M. (2003). The transfer of university concepts and practices between Germany, the United States, and Japan: A comparative perspective. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of London.Google Scholar
  63. US Department of Education (1987). Japanese education today. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  64. US Department of Education (1999). The educational system in Germany: Case study findings. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  65. Zymek, B. (1975). Das Ausland als Argument in der pädagogischen Reformdiskussion. Ratingen: Aloys Henn Verlag.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Phillips

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations